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James Arkwright

Meet our Staff

At BTI, you will learn from staff who are experienced teachers and educators, researchers, practitioners, health workers and graduates themselves. Many have worked in private practice, for public institutions and for universities in Aotearoa New Zealand and overseas 

Dr James Arkwright
Dr James Arkwright
Certification : EdD, MEd(Hons) Counselling, BA (American Literature)
Staff Code : #
Phone : 07 562 2947
Email : j.arkwright@bti.ac.nz

Biography

James teaches in the School of Social Practice and in BTI’s postgraduate programmes. He has a special interest in narrative therapy, having safe and effective counselling processes for people who have experienced trauma and abuse, and the interface between a counsellor’s sense of self and personal values and his/her counselling practice. James completed his doctoral thesis in 2011. His thesis title was “Discourse, narrative and agency; a contribution of local stories to disability theory, research and professional practice.”

Research

Arkwright, J. (2018). Inclusion in education: ‘A piggy back will do?’. In C. Matthews., U. Edgington., & A. Channon (Eds.), Teaching with sociological imagination in higher education: Contexts, pedagogies, reflections (pp. 19-38). Singapore: Springer.

Arkwright, J. (2018). The narrative and discursive challenge of resisting subject positions of deficit when you have an illness or disability. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Arkwright, J., & Chihota, C. (in press). Using appreciative inquiry and multimodal texts as transformative tools within a Christ‐following, missional, learning community. In J. Luetz, T. Dowden, B. Norsworthy (Eds.), Reimagining Christian education: Cultivating transformative approaches (Chapter 17). London, England: Springer.

Arkwright, J. (2016, July). Inclusive education: “A piggy back will (not) do?” Paper presented to Learning and Loves: Reimagining Christian Education Scholars Conference, Christian Heritage College, Brisbane, Australia.

Arkwright, J. (in press). Inclusive Education: “A piggy back will do?”. In C. Matthews., U. Edgington., & A. Channon (Eds.), Teaching with sociological imagination in higher education: Contexts, pedagogies, reflections (chapter 5). London, England: Springer.

Arkwright, J. (2015, September). Employing a narrative and discursive reading of disability and illness accounts. Paper presented at BTI Research Symposium, Tauranga, New Zealand.

Arkwright, J., & Chihota, C. (2015, September). Learning by doing: Exploring institutional best practice through appreciative inquiry. Paper presented at BTI Research Symposium, Tauranga, New Zealand.

Arkwright, J. (2014). Methodological Borderlands: The advantage of spreading the conceptual net when it comes to qualitative research analysis. Paper presented at the AARE/NZARE conference “Speaking back through research”, Brisbane, Nov 30 – Dec 4.

Arkwright, J. (2011). Discourse, narrative and agency: A contribution of local stories to disability theory, research and professional practice. Unpublished doctoral thesis, University of Waikato, Hamilton, NZ.

Arkwright, J. (2011). Illness, Impairment and disability:Language and metaphor in six people’s actions of agency. Paper presented at the School of Counselling and Human Development Community Day, University of Waikato, Hamilton, NZ.

Arkwright, J. (2011). It was that “f****n briefcase!”: The discursive complexity of six people’s actions of resistance to their experiences of difficulty, disadvantage and discrimination. Paper presented at the EveryBody In, Disability Studies, Dunedin.

Arkwright, J. (2010). Drawing on the post-structural concepts of positioning, subjectivity and agency to understand the disability experience: The Story of David. Paper presented at the NZAC Research Conference, Tauranga.

Arkwright, J. (2009). Body struggles – implications for self, family and community when impairment or illness resides in the body. Paper presented at the NZCCA Conference, Auckland, 7-9 May.

Arkwright, J. (2009). Exploring actions of agency when living with illness or impairment. Paper presented at the NZAC Conference, Hamilton, NZ 17- 20 September.

Arkwright, J. (2008). Thinking beyond deficit positioning of self: Relevance for practice and faith. In R. Cook & I. Alexander (Eds.), Interweavings: Conversations between Narrative Therapy and Christian faith (pp. 126-142). North Charleston, SC: CreateSpace Book

Meet our Staff

At BTI, you will learn from staff who are experienced teachers and educators, researchers, practitioners, health workers and graduates themselves. Many have worked in private practice, for public institutions and for universities in Aotearoa New Zealand and overseas 

Dr James Arkwright
Dr James Arkwright
Certification : EdD, MEd(Hons) Counselling, BA (American Literature)
Staff Code :
Phone : 07 562 2947
Email : j.arkwright@bti.ac.nz

Biography

James teaches in the School of Social Practice and in BTI’s postgraduate programmes. He has a special interest in narrative therapy, having safe and effective counselling processes for people who have experienced trauma and abuse, and the interface between a counsellor’s sense of self and personal values and his/her counselling practice. James completed his doctoral thesis in 2011. His thesis title was “Discourse, narrative and agency; a contribution of local stories to disability theory, research and professional practice.”

Research

Arkwright, J. (2018). Inclusion in education: ‘A piggy back will do?’. In C. Matthews., U. Edgington., & A. Channon (Eds.), Teaching with sociological imagination in higher education: Contexts, pedagogies, reflections (pp. 19-38). Singapore: Springer.

Arkwright, J. (2018). The narrative and discursive challenge of resisting subject positions of deficit when you have an illness or disability. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Arkwright, J., & Chihota, C. (in press). Using appreciative inquiry and multimodal texts as transformative tools within a Christ‐following, missional, learning community. In J. Luetz, T. Dowden, B. Norsworthy (Eds.), Reimagining Christian education: Cultivating transformative approaches (Chapter 17). London, England: Springer.

Arkwright, J. (2016, July). Inclusive education: “A piggy back will (not) do?” Paper presented to Learning and Loves: Reimagining Christian Education Scholars Conference, Christian Heritage College, Brisbane, Australia.

Arkwright, J. (in press). Inclusive Education: “A piggy back will do?”. In C. Matthews., U. Edgington., & A. Channon (Eds.), Teaching with sociological imagination in higher education: Contexts, pedagogies, reflections (chapter 5). London, England: Springer.

Arkwright, J. (2015, September). Employing a narrative and discursive reading of disability and illness accounts. Paper presented at BTI Research Symposium, Tauranga, New Zealand.

Arkwright, J., & Chihota, C. (2015, September). Learning by doing: Exploring institutional best practice through appreciative inquiry. Paper presented at BTI Research Symposium, Tauranga, New Zealand.

Arkwright, J. (2014). Methodological Borderlands: The advantage of spreading the conceptual net when it comes to qualitative research analysis. Paper presented at the AARE/NZARE conference “Speaking back through research”, Brisbane, Nov 30 – Dec 4.

Arkwright, J. (2011). Discourse, narrative and agency: A contribution of local stories to disability theory, research and professional practice. Unpublished doctoral thesis, University of Waikato, Hamilton, NZ.

Arkwright, J. (2011). Illness, Impairment and disability:Language and metaphor in six people’s actions of agency. Paper presented at the School of Counselling and Human Development Community Day, University of Waikato, Hamilton, NZ.

Arkwright, J. (2011). It was that “f****n briefcase!”: The discursive complexity of six people’s actions of resistance to their experiences of difficulty, disadvantage and discrimination. Paper presented at the EveryBody In, Disability Studies, Dunedin.

Arkwright, J. (2010). Drawing on the post-structural concepts of positioning, subjectivity and agency to understand the disability experience: The Story of David. Paper presented at the NZAC Research Conference, Tauranga.

Arkwright, J. (2009). Body struggles – implications for self, family and community when impairment or illness resides in the body. Paper presented at the NZCCA Conference, Auckland, 7-9 May.

Arkwright, J. (2009). Exploring actions of agency when living with illness or impairment. Paper presented at the NZAC Conference, Hamilton, NZ 17- 20 September.

Arkwright, J. (2008). Thinking beyond deficit positioning of self: Relevance for practice and faith. In R. Cook & I. Alexander (Eds.), Interweavings: Conversations between Narrative Therapy and Christian faith (pp. 126-142). North Charleston, SC: CreateSpace Book

Dr James Arkwright
Dr James Arkwright
Counselling, Executive Leadership Team, Head of School, Master of Professional Practice & Leadership, Social Practice, Social Work
|
EdD, MEd(Hons) Counselling, BA (American Literature)
Staff code #
07 562 2947
j.arkwright@bti.ac.nz
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